This document includes the results of the study Contributions of Indigenous Women's Entrepreneurship in Colombia to their Economy, Territorial Governance and Climate Resilience during COVID-19, which brings together four case studies of entrepreneurship led by Indigenous women from different regions of Colombia.

Young Indigenous, Afro-descendant and Local Latin American Communities United for the Defense of Ancestral Territories
Young Indigenous, Afro-descendant and Local Latin American Communities United for the Defense of Ancestral Territories

Eighteen young leaders from 10 Latin American countries call on governments,donors, and grassroots organizations to include youth in decision-making that impacts their territorial rights, and to strengthen their understanding of biodiversity management and conservation efforts.

Afro-descendant Peoples’ Territories in Biodiversity Hotspots across Latin America and the Caribbean
Afro-descendant Peoples’ Territories in Biodiversity Hotspots across Latin America and the Caribbean

This study seeks to raise awareness of the territorial presence of Afro-descendant Peoples in 16 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Although Afro-descendant Peoples in the region have been fighting for a place in international climate and conservation debates, not having defined boundaries for their ancestral lands has been an obstacle to adequately establishing how important their territories are for protecting biodiversity.

This report identifies possible pathways towards the integration of a rights-based approach in the legal conservation frameworks of Colombia and Peru. It does so in the context of tenure rights recognition for Indigenous Peoples (IP) and Afro-descendant Peoples (ADP) as an effective strategy for biodiversity protection in the Amazon. With this in mind, it highlights opportunities for implementing a rights-based approach within current and medium-term conservation frameworks and policies in both countries.

Inclusion of human, ethnic and gender rights in the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of Colombia and Peru (in Spanish)
Inclusion of human, ethnic and gender rights in the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) of Colombia and Peru (in Spanish)

In December 2015, the Paris Agreement was adopted at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Five years after the submission the NDC proposals and their initial implementation, signatory countries had to update and share the progress of their NDCs in 2020. This study carried out by Asociación Ambiente y Sociedad, ONAMIAP (National Organization of Andean and Amazonian Indigenous Women of Peru) and RRI analyzes the degree that human rights, women’s rights, and the rights of Indigenous Peoples and Afro-descendants are included in the NDCs of Colombia and Peru, as well as in the processes related to updating them.

Whose Water?
Whose Water?

This report presents an innovative, international comparative assessment on the extent to which various national-level legal frameworks recognize the freshwater tenure rights of Indigenous Peoples, Afro-descendants, and local communities, as well as the specific rights of women to use and govern community waters.

A Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands
A Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands

If properly leveraged, natural climate solutions can contribute over 37% of cost-effective CO2 mitigation by 2030. Evidence shows Indigenous Peoples and local communities are key to achieving such outcomes. This report presents the most comprehensive assessment to date of carbon storage in documented community lands worldwide.

This report discusses the critical role of Indigenous Peoples and local communities in the context of emerging climate and development priorities, and the unprecedented opportunity to scale up the recognition and protection of community land and resource rights—both for the benefit of rural peoples and for the realization of global peace and prosperity.

Toward a Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands
Toward a Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands

A new report quantifying the carbon stored aboveground in tropical forests that are legally owned or traditionally held by Indigenous Peoples and local communities in 37 countries across tropical America, Africa, and Asia.

Can you Imagine?
Can you Imagine?

These are the opening remarks to participants at Conference on Forest Tenure and Regulatory Reforms: Experiences” Lessons and Future Steps in Asia. The remarks were…

REDD+ 2010
REDD+ 2010

This briefing note REDD+ 2010: Moving Forward for People and Forests overviews progress made on REDD+ at the December 2009 Copenhagen climate talks. Designed to…