Afro-descendant Peoples’ Territories in Biodiversity Hotspots across Latin America and the Caribbean
Afro-descendant Peoples’ Territories in Biodiversity Hotspots across Latin America and the Caribbean

This study seeks to raise awareness of the territorial presence of Afro-descendant Peoples in 16 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Although Afro-descendant Peoples in the region have been fighting for a place in international climate and conservation debates, not having defined boundaries for their ancestral lands has been an obstacle to adequately establishing how important their territories are for protecting biodiversity.

Pastoralists are well adapted to harsh environments and have deep knowledge about their natural resources. They have also suffered from drought, famine, political interference, physical insecurity, armed aggression, increasing impoverishment, and marginalization. Despite these obstacles, pastoralists have long managed their lands for various purposes including livestock mobility, which depends on large commonly owned landscapes, knowledge of ecosystem productivity, and on the ability to negotiate access to resources.

Reconciling Conservation and Global Biodiversity Goals with Community Land Rights in Asia
Reconciling Conservation and Global Biodiversity Goals with Community Land Rights in Asia

This report argues that to effectively and equitably mitigate climate change and biodiversity loss, new conservation modalities are needed to end exclusionary approaches, embrace human rights-based strategies, and advance the recognition of the land, forest, water, and territorial rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities who customarily own over half of the world’s lands.

Significance of Community-Held Territories in 24 Countries to Global Climate
Significance of Community-Held Territories in 24 Countries to Global Climate

This research provides a timely reminder of the global significance of community-held lands and territories; their importance for the protection, restoration, and sustainable use of tropical forestlands across the world; and the critical gaps in the international development architecture that have so far undermined progress towards the legal recognition of such lands and territories.

Este estudo analisa a situação do reconhecimento legal dos direitos dos Povos Indígenas, comunidades locais e Povos Afrodescendentes ao carbono em suas terras e territórios em 31 países da África, Ásia e América Latina.10 Juntos, esses países defendem quase 70 por cento das florestas tropicais do mundo11 e representam pelo menos 62 por cento do potencial total de solução climática natural viável identificado por McKinsey et al. (2021),12 e, portanto, a maior parte das reduções de emissões baseadas na natureza e oportunidades de compensação de carbono em países com florestas tropicais e subtropicais.

This study reviews the status of the legal recognition of the rights of Indigenous Peoples, local communities, and Afro-descendant Peoples to the carbon in their lands and territories across 31 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Together, these countries hold almost 70 percent of the world’s tropical forests and represent at least 62 percent of the total feasible natural climate solution potential, and thus the bulk of nature-based emissions reductions and carbon offset opportunities in tropical and subtropical forest countries.

Esta análise mostra que a grande maioria dos países com florestas tropicais que procuram se beneficiar dos mercados internacionais de carbono florestal ainda não definiu na lei e na prática os direitos dos Povos Indígenas, comunidades locais e Povos Afrodescendentes sobre o carbono em suas terras e territórios consuetudinários.

This analysis shows that the vast majority of tropical forested countries seeking to benefit from international forest carbon markets have yet to define in law and in practice the rights of Indigenous Peoples, local communities, and Afro-descendant Peoples over carbon in their customary lands and territories.

UNDER THE COVER OF COVID: New Laws in Asia Favor Business at the Cost of Indigenous Peoples’ and Local Communities’ Land and Territorial Rights
UNDER THE COVER OF COVID: New Laws in Asia Favor Business at the Cost of Indigenous Peoples’ and Local Communities’ Land and Territorial Rights

This brief discusses legislative developments during COVID-19 in India, Indonesia, and the Philippines that undermine sustainable human-environment interactions and broader enjoyment of Indigenous and community rights over their customary territories.

A Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands
A Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands

If properly leveraged, natural climate solutions can contribute over 37% of cost-effective CO2 mitigation by 2030. Evidence shows Indigenous Peoples and local communities are key to achieving such outcomes. This report presents the most comprehensive assessment to date of carbon storage in documented community lands worldwide.

Cornered by Protected Areas
Cornered by Protected Areas

Despite widespread poverty and insecure resource rights, evidence shows that Indigenous Peoples and local communities are still spending their limited resources on conservation efforts. They are also achieving outcomes that are at least equivalent to those of government-funded protected areas. This brief shows an urgent need to replace the fortress-conservation model with rights-based approaches to both improve conservation outcomes and end human-rights abuses committed in the name of conservation.

This brief presents a review of the nominal progress made in the national-level laws and regulations that govern the carbon trade and define the rights of parties—across a sample of 24 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. These countries collectively hold more than 50 percent of global tropical and subtropical forests.

The Green Climate Fund: Accomplishing a Paradigm Shift?
The Green Climate Fund: Accomplishing a Paradigm Shift?

Drawing on international standards and Green Climate Fund policy documents, this report traces the adequacy and implementation effectiveness of the Fund’s current institutional frameworks across a representative sample of approved projects. Noting critical gaps in nearly every aspect of the Fund’s operational modalities and project approval processes, the report calls on the GCF to take progressive steps to make Indigenous Peoples’ and local communities’ rights a key part of its climate actions going forward.

From Risk and Conflict to Peace and Prosperity
From Risk and Conflict to Peace and Prosperity

Amid the realities of major political turbulence, there was growing recognition in 2016 that community land rights are key to ensuring peace and prosperity, economic development, sound investment, and climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Promise and Performance: 10 Years of the Forest Rights Act in India
Promise and Performance: 10 Years of the Forest Rights Act in India

This report highlights FRA’s potential in transforming forest governance by empowering local communities and the gram sabha to protect and conserve forests; ensuring livelihood security and poverty alleviation; securing gender justice; meeting SDG, especially the goals of eliminating poverty and achieving ecological sustainability; and dealing with climate change.

Land Conflicts in India: An Interim Analysis
Land Conflicts in India: An Interim Analysis

This analysis provides a powerful instrument to understand land resource conflicts in India. Based on the emerging patterns from the analysis of the 289 conflicts, our assessment is that this brief has captured roughly 25- 40 percent of active and substantive land conflicts in the country.

Land Disputes and Stalled Investments in India
Land Disputes and Stalled Investments in India

This analysis seeks to provide evidence-based insight into the thousands of investment projects stalled to date in India.

Toward a Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands
Toward a Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands

A new report quantifying the carbon stored aboveground in tropical forests that are legally owned or traditionally held by Indigenous Peoples and local communities in 37 countries across tropical America, Africa, and Asia.

Community Rights and Tenure in Country Emission Reduction Programs
Community Rights and Tenure in Country Emission Reduction Programs

New research from RRI reveals that 13 submissions to the World Bank’s Carbon Fund–one of the most advanced REDD+ initiatives–either fail to recognize the importance of land rights or adequately include local peoples in key decision-making processes.

Indigenous Peoples & Local Community Tenure in the INDCs
Indigenous Peoples & Local Community Tenure in the INDCs

A review of submitted Intended Nationally Determined Contributions to determine the extent to which Parties made clear commitments to strengthen or expand the tenure and natural resource management rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities as part of their climate change mitigation plans.