A Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands

Forests and other lands are essential for achieving climate and development ambitions. If appropriately leveraged, natural climate solutions can contribute upwards of 37 percent of cost-effective CO2 mitigation by 2030, and evidence shows Indigenous Peoples and local communities are key to achieving such outcomes. This report presents the most comprehensive assessment to date of carbon storage in documented community lands worldwide.

This analysis reports on trends in global forest tenure over the fifteen-year period from 2002-2017. It is the fourth in a series of analyses monitoring the legal recognition of forest tenure around the world according to four categories of legally recognized (statutory) forest tenure: government administered, designated for Indigenous Peoples and local communities, owned by Indigenous Peoples and local communities, and privately owned by individuals and firms.

Legislative Best Practices for Securing Women’s Rights to Community Lands

This brief highlights key attributes of national constitutions, laws, and regulations that play a fundamental role in protecting indigenous and rural women’s rights to community forests and other community lands. These legislative best practices were derived from a 2017 analysis of over 400 national laws and regulations, Power and Potential, which evaluates the extent to which women’s rights to community forests are recognized by national law in 30 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) across Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

Tenure and Investment in Southeast Asia

This document provides an empirical picture of the causes and effects of tenure-related disputes between private sector actors and local peoples across Southeast Asia. It…

Women’s Leadership, Agency, and Voice

This report synthesizes research findings on gender dynamics and the implications for gender justice in community-based tenure systems in Zambia and Bolivia.

Power and Potential

A new analysis from RRI provides an unprecedented assessment of legal frameworks regarding indigenous and rural women’s community forest rights in 30 developing countries comprising 78 percent of the developing world’s forests.

From Risk and Conflict to Peace and Prosperity

Amid the realities of major political turbulence, there was growing recognition in 2016 that community land rights are key to ensuring peace and prosperity, economic development, sound investment, and climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Community Rights and Tenure in Country Emission Reduction Programs

New research from RRI reveals that 13 submissions to the World Bank’s Carbon Fund–one of the most advanced REDD+ initiatives–either fail to recognize the importance of land rights or adequately include local peoples in key decision-making processes.

Indigenous Peoples & Local Community Tenure in the INDCs

A review of submitted Intended Nationally Determined Contributions to determine the extent to which Parties made clear commitments to strengthen or expand the tenure and natural resource management rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities as part of their climate change mitigation plans.

IAN: Managing Tenure Risk

This report explains what tenure risk is and offers objective evidence that the problem is widespread and of increasing frequency, as well as provides highlights from a real-world analysis of over 360 case studies.

Who Owns the World’s Land?

The first analysis to quantify the amount of land formally recognized by national governments as owned or controlled by Indigenous Peoples and local communities around the world.

Securing Rights, Combating Climate Change

An analysis of the growing body of evidence linking community forest rights with healthier forests and lower carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from deforestation and forest degradation.

What Future for Reform?

While governments are increasingly recognizing local ownership and control of forests, forest tenure arrangements remain in dispute or unclear in many places, including low, middle, and high income countries.

What Rights?

A legal analysis of the national legislation assessing whether these legal systems recognize the community rights to access, withdraw, manage, exclude and alienate to forest resources and land.

From Exclusion to Ownership?

This report measures whether governments have continued to reduce their legal ownership and control of the world’s forests from 2002 – 2008, and assesses the implications of forest tenure change for forest peoples, governments, and the global community.

Who Owns the World’s Forests?

The questions of who owns the forests, who claims them, who has access to them and further, who should own them, are hotly contested in many forest regions of the world.