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  • Recent Analysis

    A Global Baseline of Carbon Storage in Collective Lands

    This report provides the most comprehensive assessment to date of carbon storage in documented community lands worldwide.

  • Featured Tool

    Tenure Data Tool

    An interactive database for comparing changes in forest tenure from 2002 to 2013 in some of the world’s most highly-forested countries.

  • Featured Resources

    The Tenure Facility

    A unique new institution that provides grants to advance land and forest tenure security and the rights and livelihoods of Indigenous Peoples and local communities.

    Featured Resources

    Interlaken Group

    A network of diverse actors that creates, adopts, and disseminates tools and mechanisms to accelerate private sector learning on responsible land rights practices.

    Featured Resources

    LandMark Map

    The first online, interactive global platform providing maps and other information on collective lands to address the lack of public and reliable tenure data.

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Latest News

Featured  | 23 .10. 2018
An Historic Victory for Liberian People and Communities

On September 19, Liberian President George Manneh Weah signed into law the Land Rights Bill (LRB), a landmark piece of legislation that recognizes the rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities to their customary lands and gives customary land the same standing as private land in Liberia. This historic victory sets a precedent for land rights recognition in West Africa and can serve as a model for the region and beyond.

 | 19 .10. 2018
Opinion: Protect indigenous, community, and women’s land rights for food security and nutrition

Around 1 in 9 people in the world — 821 million — are undernourished. After a prolonged decline, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations found that world hunger is rising once again.

The world’s food systems need to be transformed to curb this trend. Legally recognized and protected land rights for indigenous peoples and local communities in the developing world are a key part of revitalizing the world’s food systems. In particular, the rights of rural and indigenous women to support diverse, local agricultural production require urgent attention.

 | 10 .10. 2018
How Carbon Trading Became a Way of Life for California’s Yurok Tribe

A number of experts now believe that reclaiming land for indigenous people is the best way to protect the Earth’s forests. According to the Rights and Resources Initiative, an N.G.O. that advocates for native land rights, legally recognized indigenous forests “tend to store more carbon and experience lower rates of deforestation.” But in a recent report supported by data from the Woods Hole Research Center, the initiative found that while indigenous communities currently manage forests and soil containing nearly three hundred billion metric tons of carbon—thirty-three times more than global energy-related emissions in 2017—they lacked legal titles to the sites of at least a third of that carbon total.” This puts “them, their forests and the carbon they store at great risk,” Alain Frechette, one of the authors of the initiative’s report, said.

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