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Community Rights and Tenure in Country Emission Reduction Programs: Status and Risks for the FCPF Carbon Fund

Community Rights and Tenure in Country Emission Reduction Programs: Status and Risks for the FCPF Carbon Fund

Community Rights and Tenure in Country Emission Reduction Programs: Status and Risks for the FCPF Carbon Fund

Community Rights and Tenure in Country Emission Reduction Programs: Status and Risks for the FCPF Carbon Fund

Author/Org: Rights and Resources Initiative

June 13, 2016

New research from RRI reveals that 13 submissions to the World Bank’s Carbon Fund–one of the most advanced REDD+ initiatives–either fail to recognize the importance of land rights or adequately include local peoples in key decision-making processes.

View Analysis | View Analysis Summary

Framework & Assessments

This report was based on an assessment of 13 countries’ submissions to the FCPF Carbon Fund, using an analytical framework and review of the Methodological Framework, developed by RRI.

Costa Rica

2016 Country-level Assessment

Côte d’Ivoire      

2016 Country-level Assessment

DRC

2016 Country-level Assessment

Ghana

2016 Country-level Assessment

Guatemala

2016 Country-level Assessment

Indonesia

2016 Country-level Assessment

Madagascar

2016 Country-level Assessment

Mexico

2016 Country-level Assessment

Mozambique      

2016 Country-level Assessment

Nepal       

2016 Country-level Assessment

Peru

2016 Country-level Assessment

Republic of the Congo

2016 Country-level Assessment

Vietnam

2016 Country-level Assessment

Graphics

How Country Submissions to the World Bank's Carbon Fund Addressed Community Rights and Tenure | Country Chart Graphic How Country Submissions to the World Bank's Carbon Fund Addressed Community Rights and Tenure | Indicators Graphic

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Summary | Community Rights and Tenure in Country Emission Reduction Programs: Status and Risks for the FCPF Carbon Fund

Synthèse | Les Droits Communautaires et la Tenire Dans les Programmes Nationaux de Réduction des Émissions

Resumen | Derechos Comunitarios de Tenencia en los Programas Nacionales de Reducción de Emisiones

Summary | Community Rights and Tenure in Country Emission Reduction Programs: Status and Risks for the FCPF Carbon Fund

Author/Org: Rights and Resources Initiative

June 13, 2016

A decade after REDD appeared on the international scene, mechanisms to reduce emissions by protecting forests–activities referred to as REDD+–are finally moving from the idea phase to implementation. One of the more advanced REDD+ initiatives is the World Bank-led Forest Caron Partnership Facility (FCPF) Carbon Fund.

However, new research from RRI reveals that the plans submitted by governments to the Carbon Fund fall short where indigenous and community rights are concerned. The 13 submissions reviewed by RRI either fail to recognize the importance of land rights or adequately include local peoples in key decision-making processes. In fact, the World Bank’s requirements themselves fail to prioritize these rights.


The full report, the analytical framework used to conduct the assessment, the individual country assessments, the review of the Methodological Framework, and full citations can be found here.

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Protecting the DRC's Forest: Protected Areas for People and Planet

Protecting the DRC's Forest: Protected Areas for People and Planet

Author/Org: TMP Systems & RRI

June 1, 2016

The DRC is home to some of the world’s most important forests and biomes, so reducing deforestation quickly and efficiently is an important part of global climate change mitigation. This paper aims to help by estimating the potential cost of compensating people affected by the proposed expansion while respecting the principles of Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC).

It provides a set of basic recommendations that might help to reduce physical and economic displacement through site selection, policy design and alternatives to protected areas. By treating local peoples as partners in these protected area initiatives, those establishing and maintaining protected area networks can cut costs and speed up implementation.

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Indigenous Peoples & Local Community Tenure in the INDCs: Status and Recommendations

La Tenencia de los Pueblos Indígenas y las Comunidades Locales en las CPDN: Estado actual y recomendaciones

Indigenous Peoples & Local Community Tenure in the INDCs: Status and Recommendations

Author/Org: Rights and Resources Initiative

April 21, 2016

This brief presents a review of 161 Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) submitted on behalf of 188 countries for COP 21 to determine the extent to which Parties made clear commitments to strengthen or expand the tenure and natural resource management rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities as part of their climate change mitigation plans or associated adaptation actions. Of the 161 INDCs submitted, 131 are from countries with tropical and subtropical forests.

View the brief | View the Analysis Summary | View the 1-Page Summary

The document is also available in Spanish and Portuguese.

Graphics

RRI Analysis | Indigenous Peoples & Local Community Tenure in the INDCs: Status and Recommendations | 11% of countries clearly committed to community tenure rights as climate change mitigation strategy RRI Analysis | Indigenous Peoples & Local Community Tenure in the INDCs: Status and Recommendations | 167 countries did not clearly commit to community tenure rights as climate change mitigation strategy RRI Analysis | Indigenous Peoples & Local Community Tenure in the INDCs: Status and Recommendations | 17 out of 64 UN-REDD Programme Partners clearly committed to community tenure rights as climate change mitigation strategy
RRI Report: Indigenous Peoples and Local Community Tenure in the INDCs Map

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Rethinking Forest Regulations: Overcoming the challenges of regulatory reform

REPENSER LA RÈGLEMENTATION FORESTIÈRE : Surmonter les défis de la réforme réglementaire

REPENSANDO LAS REGULACIONES FORESTALES: Superando los retos de la reforma regulatoria

Rethinking Forest Regulations: Overcoming the challenges of regulatory reform

Author/Org: Jim Smyle (former Senior Natural Resources Management Specialist at World Bank), Sally Collins (former Associate Chief of the United States Forest Service), Claire Biason (RRI)

April 10, 2016

This brief is directed towards public forest sector policy and decision makers involved with the regulation and oversight of natural and regenerated forests. As such, it speaks to a narrow but extremely critical area of forest governance: forest regulations and regulatory processes as instruments and vehicles for achieving sustainable forest management (SFM) objectives. Many of the drivers and factors that mitigate against SFM lie outside the forest sector, such as forest conversion for agriculture; it is neither the purpose nor the intention of this piece to attempt to address these. Here, the intent is to focus upon issues that normally would lie within the legal mandate of public forest sector agencies and thus, within the possibilities of their leaders to affect change.

This brief is also available in French and Spanish.

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10 Years of Megaflorestais: A Public Forest Agency Leaders' Retrospective

Dix ans de MegaFlorestais: Une rétrospective des responsables des agences forestières publiques

Diez años de MegaFlorestais: Retrospectiva de líderes de agencias forestales públicas

10 Years of Megaflorestais: A Public Forest Agency Leaders' Retrospective

Author/Org: Megaflorestais

April 10, 2016

Just over a decade ago, several forest agency leaders from around the world met in Beijing, China at a conference convened by the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI), the State Forestry Administration (SFA) of China and the Chinese Center for Agriculture Policy (CCAP). As leaders—from Brazil, China, Mexico and the USA—we reflected on how few opportunities existed to learn from one another to discuss forest issues in an informal atmosphere outside of the protocol-laden, jurisdictionally-defined sessions we commonly attended. We wondered whether there was a better way—whether it was possible to have safe conversations where difficult issues, struggles and mistakes could be raised, acknowledged and learned from.

From this first conversation, MegaFlorestais was created: a self-governing group of public forest agency leaders with RRI serving as the Secretariat and main funder.

The period of 2005-2015 brought changes in forest governance, the status of forest ownership, the health of the world’s forests and the global context within which forestry decisions are made. But much has remained the same. Was MegaFlorestais a factor? What can be learned from reflecting on these changes in a decade?

Read the retrospective in Spanish, French, or Chinese.

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Common Ground: Securing land rights and safeguarding the earth

Terres Communes: Sécuriser les droits fonciers et protéger la planète

Territorio Común: Garantizar los derechos a la tierra y proteger el planeta

Common Ground: Securing land rights and safeguarding the earth

Author/Org: Oxfam, International Land Coalition, Rights and Resources Initiative

March 1, 2016

Up to 2.5 billion people depend on indigenous and community lands, which make up over 50 percent of the land on the planet; they legally own just one-fifth. The remaining land remains unprotected and vulnerable to land grabs from more powerful entities like governments and corporations. There is growing evidence of the vital role played by full legal ownership of land by indigenous peoples and local communities in preserving cultural diversity and in combating poverty and hunger, political instability and climate change. The importance of protecting and expanding indigenous and community ownership of land has been a key element in the negotiations of the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement on climate change, and is central to their successful implementation. This report launches a Global Call to Action on Indigenous and Community Land Rights, backed by more than 300 organizations all over the world. It is a manifesto of solidarity with the ongoing struggles of indigenous peoples and local communities seeking to secure their land rights once and for all. Learn more about the Global Call to Action at landrightsnow.org.

Infographics

Global-Call-to-Action_Secure-Land-Rights-Equal_Animated-Gif  

Global-Call-To-Action_Tauli-Corpuz_Facebook_RRI Global-Call-To-Action_Ban-Ki-Moon_Facebook_with-logos
Global-Call-To-Action_women_Facebook_RRI Global-Call-To-Action_Sachs_Facebook_RRI
Global-Call-To-Action_languages_Facebook_RRI Global-Call-To-Action_Fredericks_Facebook_RRI
Global-Call-To-Action_carbon_Facebook_RRI Global-Call-To-Action_2-5billion_Facebook_RRI

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Protecting Liberia’s Forest: Conservation for People and Planet

Protecting Liberia’s Forest: Conservation for People and Planet

Author/Org: TMP Systems & Rights and Resources Initiative

February 3, 2016

Liberia holds some of the last remaining, intact forests in West Africa and so reducing deforestation quickly and efficiently would be important in global climate change mitigation efforts. This paper aims to help by providing a rough sense of how many people might be affected by the protected area plans. It then examines evidence on compensation costs to give a sense of the budget that might be required if principles of Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) are respected per Liberia’s new Land Rights Policy.

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IAN: Managing Tenure Risk

IAN: Managing Tenure Risk

Author/Org: TMP Systems & Rights and Resources Initiative

February 3, 2016

In recent years, sectors like mining, energy and agriculture have seen a substantial increase in disputes with local populations over land and resource rights, which threaten the viability of projects. The problem is particularly acute in emerging markets, where 93 percent of concessions are inhabited. We refer to this problem as “tenure risk”.

Conversations with a range of investors and companies indicated that handling this risk was not only impossible using current approaches, but also, that coverage for the risk may well be excluded from standard forms of insurance. Addressing this problem requires close analysis of tenure risk, and better tools for translating those lessons into concrete action.

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Closing the Gap: Strategies and scale needed to secure rights and save forests

Combler L'Écart : Stratégies et actions nécessaires pour sécuriser les droits et préserver les forêts

¿Cómo Cerrar le Brecha? Magnitud de las estrategias para proteger los derechos de tenencia y salvar los bosques

Closing the Gap: Strategies and scale needed to secure rights and save forests

Author/Org: Rights and Resources Initiative

February 3, 2016

The annual review of the state of rights and resources, 2015-2016. Ten years ago, it was a struggle to make indigenous and community rights part of global discussions on forest conservation and climate change. By the close of 2015 it was clear that the case had been made. There is still much further to go, with millions of Indigenous Peoples and local communities lacking legal rights to the vast majority of their customary lands, putting at risk their livelihoods and the sustainability of hundreds of millions of hectares of forest.

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The Science Is In: Community Governance Supports Forest Livelihoods and Sustainability

The Science Is In: Community Governance Supports Forest Livelihoods and Sustainability

Author/Org: Rights and Resources Initiative & International Forestry Resources and Institutions

February 3, 2016

Major strides have been made in global policies on climate change and sustainable development. Both the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) fail, however, to take advantage of recent scientific findings that confirm what forest dwellers have long known: effective environmental governance is best achieved through community-based approaches

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